The Black Father in My Life by Z

In 1978, a single white mother living in San Francisco with her biracial daughter, meets and eventually creates a family with Jamal, a black male music student and single father. Despite stereotypes, their relationship blossomed into a loving, enduring marriage, raising their children and later enjoying their grandchildren together. This story challenges common stereotypes and calls attention to the potential of black fathers unjustly incarcerated.

Review of Little Bird series by Wendy Millstine

I watched the miniseries of Little Bird (2023), based on a true story, which follows a young Indigenous woman from Canada, who was adopted by a Jewish family, as she reconnects with her past and finds her birth family. According to The Guardian, in an article titled, “Cultural genocide: the …

Listening to the Stories by Susan Panttaja

This week, I went to the theater to see Origin, the new movie directed by Ava duVernay, based on the book Caste by Isabel Wilkerson. The film follows Wilkerson as she develops her theory of the parallels between racism in the U.S., the subjugation of the Dalits at the bottom of India’s caste …

Reflection

By Z On this eve of the coming New Year, I hope we will all take a few minutes to reflect on our relationship with Race. How many times during the last year did you challenge some racist thought or action in someone else? How many times during the last …

PERSONAL REPARATIONS by Dinah Bachrach

A friend recently gifted my partner and me with an historical novel that just came out, written by a Southern white woman, Barbara Small: Faith’s Reckoning. It gripped me, touched me to tears several times, educated me. And left me wanting to recommend it highly to all my white, anti-racist …

The Wisdom of Dr. Catherine Meeks

by Z As I delved into discovering the exact perspective of Dr. Meeks on how to start to heal racism, I came across her blog called A FEW SHADES BRAVER BLOG. Here I found a wealth of wisdom and common sense with some essays that especially struck me. In response …